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-rw-r--r--.mailmap9
-rw-r--r--Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt36
-rw-r--r--Documentation/cdrom/cdrom-standard.rst4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/core-api/idr.rst32
-rw-r--r--Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst15
-rw-r--r--Documentation/dev-tools/kgdb.rst16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/features/debug/kmemleak/arch-support.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/features/debug/stackprotector/arch-support.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/features/locking/lockdep/arch-support.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/features/time/context-tracking/arch-support.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/filesystems/journalling.rst66
-rw-r--r--Documentation/i2c/index.rst1
-rw-r--r--Documentation/i2c/upgrading-clients.rst285
-rw-r--r--Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/process/2.Process.rst2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/trace/intel_th.rst2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/cpu-load.rst4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/index.rst2
18 files changed, 105 insertions, 379 deletions
diff --git a/.mailmap b/.mailmap
index a96f1b38fa58..83d8d0158f3b 100644
--- a/.mailmap
+++ b/.mailmap
@@ -2,11 +2,16 @@
# This list is used by git-shortlog to fix a few botched name translations
# in the git archive, either because the author's full name was messed up
# and/or not always written the same way, making contributions from the
-# same person appearing not to be so or badly displayed.
+# same person appearing not to be so or badly displayed. Also allows for
+# old email addresses to map to new email addresses.
#
+# For format details, see "MAPPING AUTHORS" in "man git-shortlog".
+#
+# Please keep this list dictionary sorted.
+#
+# This comment is parsed by git-shortlog:
# repo-abbrev: /pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/
#
-
Aaron Durbin <adurbin@google.com>
Adam Oldham <oldhamca@gmail.com>
Adam Radford <aradford@gmail.com>
diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt b/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
index 98ea67f27809..bdc1f33fd3d1 100644
--- a/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
+++ b/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
@@ -724,7 +724,7 @@
memory region [offset, offset + size] for that kernel
image. If '@offset' is omitted, then a suitable offset
is selected automatically.
- [KNL, x86_64] select a region under 4G first, and
+ [KNL, X86-64] Select a region under 4G first, and
fall back to reserve region above 4G when '@offset'
hasn't been specified.
See Documentation/admin-guide/kdump/kdump.rst for further details.
@@ -737,14 +737,14 @@
Documentation/admin-guide/kdump/kdump.rst for an example.
crashkernel=size[KMG],high
- [KNL, x86_64] range could be above 4G. Allow kernel
+ [KNL, X86-64] range could be above 4G. Allow kernel
to allocate physical memory region from top, so could
be above 4G if system have more than 4G ram installed.
Otherwise memory region will be allocated below 4G, if
available.
It will be ignored if crashkernel=X is specified.
crashkernel=size[KMG],low
- [KNL, x86_64] range under 4G. When crashkernel=X,high
+ [KNL, X86-64] range under 4G. When crashkernel=X,high
is passed, kernel could allocate physical memory region
above 4G, that cause second kernel crash on system
that require some amount of low memory, e.g. swiotlb
@@ -1427,7 +1427,7 @@
gamma= [HW,DRM]
- gart_fix_e820= [X86_64] disable the fix e820 for K8 GART
+ gart_fix_e820= [X86-64] disable the fix e820 for K8 GART
Format: off | on
default: on
@@ -1814,7 +1814,7 @@
Format: 0 | 1
Default set by CONFIG_INIT_ON_FREE_DEFAULT_ON.
- init_pkru= [x86] Specify the default memory protection keys rights
+ init_pkru= [X86] Specify the default memory protection keys rights
register contents for all processes. 0x55555554 by
default (disallow access to all but pkey 0). Can
override in debugfs after boot.
@@ -1822,7 +1822,7 @@
inport.irq= [HW] Inport (ATI XL and Microsoft) busmouse driver
Format: <irq>
- int_pln_enable [x86] Enable power limit notification interrupt
+ int_pln_enable [X86] Enable power limit notification interrupt
integrity_audit=[IMA]
Format: { "0" | "1" }
@@ -1840,7 +1840,7 @@
bypassed by not enabling DMAR with this option. In
this case, gfx device will use physical address for
DMA.
- forcedac [x86_64]
+ forcedac [X86-64]
With this option iommu will not optimize to look
for io virtual address below 32-bit forcing dual
address cycle on pci bus for cards supporting greater
@@ -1925,7 +1925,7 @@
strict regions from userspace.
relaxed
- iommu= [x86]
+ iommu= [X86]
off
force
noforce
@@ -1935,8 +1935,8 @@
merge
nomerge
soft
- pt [x86]
- nopt [x86]
+ pt [X86]
+ nopt [X86]
nobypass [PPC/POWERNV]
Disable IOMMU bypass, using IOMMU for PCI devices.
@@ -2079,21 +2079,21 @@
iucv= [HW,NET]
- ivrs_ioapic [HW,X86_64]
+ ivrs_ioapic [HW,X86-64]
Provide an override to the IOAPIC-ID<->DEVICE-ID
mapping provided in the IVRS ACPI table. For
example, to map IOAPIC-ID decimal 10 to
PCI device 00:14.0 write the parameter as:
ivrs_ioapic[10]=00:14.0
- ivrs_hpet [HW,X86_64]
+ ivrs_hpet [HW,X86-64]
Provide an override to the HPET-ID<->DEVICE-ID
mapping provided in the IVRS ACPI table. For
example, to map HPET-ID decimal 0 to
PCI device 00:14.0 write the parameter as:
ivrs_hpet[0]=00:14.0
- ivrs_acpihid [HW,X86_64]
+ ivrs_acpihid [HW,X86-64]
Provide an override to the ACPI-HID:UID<->DEVICE-ID
mapping provided in the IVRS ACPI table. For
example, to map UART-HID:UID AMD0020:0 to
@@ -2370,7 +2370,7 @@
lapic [X86-32,APIC] Enable the local APIC even if BIOS
disabled it.
- lapic= [x86,APIC] "notscdeadline" Do not use TSC deadline
+ lapic= [X86,APIC] "notscdeadline" Do not use TSC deadline
value for LAPIC timer one-shot implementation. Default
back to the programmable timer unit in the LAPIC.
@@ -3188,12 +3188,12 @@
register save and restore. The kernel will only save
legacy floating-point registers on task switch.
- nohugeiomap [KNL,x86,PPC] Disable kernel huge I/O mappings.
+ nohugeiomap [KNL,X86,PPC] Disable kernel huge I/O mappings.
nosmt [KNL,S390] Disable symmetric multithreading (SMT).
Equivalent to smt=1.
- [KNL,x86] Disable symmetric multithreading (SMT).
+ [KNL,X86] Disable symmetric multithreading (SMT).
nosmt=force: Force disable SMT, cannot be undone
via the sysfs control file.
@@ -3955,7 +3955,7 @@
pt. [PARIDE]
See Documentation/admin-guide/blockdev/paride.rst.
- pti= [X86_64] Control Page Table Isolation of user and
+ pti= [X86-64] Control Page Table Isolation of user and
kernel address spaces. Disabling this feature
removes hardening, but improves performance of
system calls and interrupts.
@@ -3967,7 +3967,7 @@
Not specifying this option is equivalent to pti=auto.
- nopti [X86_64]
+ nopti [X86-64]
Equivalent to pti=off
pty.legacy_count=
diff --git a/Documentation/cdrom/cdrom-standard.rst b/Documentation/cdrom/cdrom-standard.rst
index 2de905810590..70500b189cc8 100644
--- a/Documentation/cdrom/cdrom-standard.rst
+++ b/Documentation/cdrom/cdrom-standard.rst
@@ -557,7 +557,7 @@ phase. Currently, the capabilities are any of::
CDC_DRIVE_STATUS /* driver implements drive status */
The capability flag is declared *const*, to prevent drivers from
-accidentally tampering with the contents. The capability fags actually
+accidentally tampering with the contents. The capability flags actually
inform `cdrom.c` of what the driver can do. If the drive found
by the driver does not have the capability, is can be masked out by
the *cdrom_device_info* variable *mask*. For instance, the SCSI CD-ROM
@@ -736,7 +736,7 @@ Description of routines in `cdrom.c`
Only a few routines in `cdrom.c` are exported to the drivers. In this
new section we will discuss these, as well as the functions that `take
-over' the CD-ROM interface to the kernel. The header file belonging
+over` the CD-ROM interface to the kernel. The header file belonging
to `cdrom.c` is called `cdrom.h`. Formerly, some of the contents of this
file were placed in the file `ucdrom.h`, but this file has now been
merged back into `cdrom.h`.
diff --git a/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst b/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
index a2738050c4f0..2eb5afdb9931 100644
--- a/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
+++ b/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
@@ -20,48 +20,48 @@ only ID allocation, and as a result is much more memory-efficient.
IDR usage
=========
-Start by initialising an IDR, either with :c:func:`DEFINE_IDR`
-for statically allocated IDRs or :c:func:`idr_init` for dynamically
+Start by initialising an IDR, either with DEFINE_IDR()
+for statically allocated IDRs or idr_init() for dynamically
allocated IDRs.
-You can call :c:func:`idr_alloc` to allocate an unused ID. Look up
-the pointer you associated with the ID by calling :c:func:`idr_find`
-and free the ID by calling :c:func:`idr_remove`.
+You can call idr_alloc() to allocate an unused ID. Look up
+the pointer you associated with the ID by calling idr_find()
+and free the ID by calling idr_remove().
If you need to change the pointer associated with an ID, you can call
-:c:func:`idr_replace`. One common reason to do this is to reserve an
+idr_replace(). One common reason to do this is to reserve an
ID by passing a ``NULL`` pointer to the allocation function; initialise the
object with the reserved ID and finally insert the initialised object
into the IDR.
Some users need to allocate IDs larger than ``INT_MAX``. So far all of
these users have been content with a ``UINT_MAX`` limit, and they use
-:c:func:`idr_alloc_u32`. If you need IDs that will not fit in a u32,
+idr_alloc_u32(). If you need IDs that will not fit in a u32,
we will work with you to address your needs.
If you need to allocate IDs sequentially, you can use
-:c:func:`idr_alloc_cyclic`. The IDR becomes less efficient when dealing
+idr_alloc_cyclic(). The IDR becomes less efficient when dealing
with larger IDs, so using this function comes at a slight cost.
To perform an action on all pointers used by the IDR, you can
-either use the callback-based :c:func:`idr_for_each` or the
-iterator-style :c:func:`idr_for_each_entry`. You may need to use
-:c:func:`idr_for_each_entry_continue` to continue an iteration. You can
-also use :c:func:`idr_get_next` if the iterator doesn't fit your needs.
+either use the callback-based idr_for_each() or the
+iterator-style idr_for_each_entry(). You may need to use
+idr_for_each_entry_continue() to continue an iteration. You can
+also use idr_get_next() if the iterator doesn't fit your needs.
-When you have finished using an IDR, you can call :c:func:`idr_destroy`
+When you have finished using an IDR, you can call idr_destroy()
to release the memory used by the IDR. This will not free the objects
pointed to from the IDR; if you want to do that, use one of the iterators
to do it.
-You can use :c:func:`idr_is_empty` to find out whether there are any
+You can use idr_is_empty() to find out whether there are any
IDs currently allocated.
If you need to take a lock while allocating a new ID from the IDR,
you may need to pass a restrictive set of GFP flags, which can lead
to the IDR being unable to allocate memory. To work around this,
-you can call :c:func:`idr_preload` before taking the lock, and then
-:c:func:`idr_preload_end` after the allocation.
+you can call idr_preload() before taking the lock, and then
+idr_preload_end() after the allocation.
.. kernel-doc:: include/linux/idr.h
:doc: idr sync
diff --git a/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst b/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst
index 6c791af1c859..74c5e6aeeff5 100644
--- a/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst
+++ b/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst
@@ -175,13 +175,20 @@ For example, to check drivers/net/wireless/ one may write::
make coccicheck M=drivers/net/wireless/
To apply Coccinelle on a file basis, instead of a directory basis, the
-following command may be used::
+C variable is used by the makefile to select which files to work with.
+This variable can be used to run scripts for the entire kernel, a
+specific directory, or for a single file.
- make C=1 CHECK="scripts/coccicheck"
+For example, to check drivers/bluetooth/bfusb.c, the value 1 is
+passed to the C variable to check files that make considers
+need to be compiled.::
-To check only newly edited code, use the value 2 for the C flag, i.e.::
+ make C=1 CHECK=scripts/coccicheck drivers/bluetooth/bfusb.o
- make C=2 CHECK="scripts/coccicheck"
+The value 2 is passed to the C variable to check files regardless of
+whether they need to be compiled or not.::
+
+ make C=2 CHECK=scripts/coccicheck drivers/bluetooth/bfusb.o
In these modes, which work on a file basis, there is no information
about semantic patches displayed, and no commit message proposed.
diff --git a/Documentation/dev-tools/kgdb.rst b/Documentation/dev-tools/kgdb.rst
index 0e52e966a153..c908ef4d3f04 100644
--- a/Documentation/dev-tools/kgdb.rst
+++ b/Documentation/dev-tools/kgdb.rst
@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ driver as a loadable kernel module kgdbwait will not do anything.
Kernel parameter: ``kgdbcon``
-----------------------------
-The ``kgdbcon`` feature allows you to see :c:func:`printk` messages inside gdb
+The ``kgdbcon`` feature allows you to see printk() messages inside gdb
while gdb is connected to the kernel. Kdb does not make use of the kgdbcon
feature.
@@ -432,7 +432,7 @@ This is a quick example of how to use kdb.
``ps`` Displays only the active processes
``ps A`` Shows all the processes
``summary`` Shows kernel version info and memory usage
- ``bt`` Get a backtrace of the current process using :c:func:`dump_stack`
+ ``bt`` Get a backtrace of the current process using dump_stack()
``dmesg`` View the kernel syslog buffer
``go`` Continue the system
=========== =================================================================
@@ -724,7 +724,7 @@ The kernel debugger is organized into a number of components:
The arch-specific portion implements:
- contains an arch-specific trap catcher which invokes
- :c:func:`kgdb_handle_exception` to start kgdb about doing its work
+ kgdb_handle_exception() to start kgdb about doing its work
- translation to and from gdb specific packet format to :c:type:`pt_regs`
@@ -769,7 +769,7 @@ The kernel debugger is organized into a number of components:
config. Later run ``modprobe kdb_hello`` and the next time you
enter the kdb shell, you can run the ``hello`` command.
- - The implementation for :c:func:`kdb_printf` which emits messages directly
+ - The implementation for kdb_printf() which emits messages directly
to I/O drivers, bypassing the kernel log.
- SW / HW breakpoint management for the kdb shell
@@ -875,7 +875,7 @@ kernel when ``CONFIG_KDB_KEYBOARD=y`` is set in the kernel configuration.
The core polled keyboard driver for PS/2 type keyboards is in
``drivers/char/kdb_keyboard.c``. This driver is hooked into the debug core
when kgdboc populates the callback in the array called
-:c:type:`kdb_poll_funcs[]`. The :c:func:`kdb_get_kbd_char` is the top-level
+:c:type:`kdb_poll_funcs[]`. The kdb_get_kbd_char() is the top-level
function which polls hardware for single character input.
kgdboc and kms
@@ -887,10 +887,10 @@ that you have a video driver which has a frame buffer console and atomic
kernel mode setting support.
Every time the kernel debugger is entered it calls
-:c:func:`kgdboc_pre_exp_handler` which in turn calls :c:func:`con_debug_enter`
+kgdboc_pre_exp_handler() which in turn calls con_debug_enter()
in the virtual console layer. On resuming kernel execution, the kernel
-debugger calls :c:func:`kgdboc_post_exp_handler` which in turn calls
-:c:func:`con_debug_leave`.
+debugger calls kgdboc_post_exp_handler() which in turn calls
+con_debug_leave().
Any video driver that wants to be compatible with the kernel debugger
and the atomic kms callbacks must implement the ``mode_set_base_atomic``,
diff --git a/Documentation/features/debug/kmemleak/arch-support.txt b/Documentation/features/debug/kmemleak/arch-support.txt
index b7e4f3608838..2db76807ec6f 100644
--- a/Documentation/features/debug/kmemleak/arch-support.txt
+++ b/Documentation/features/debug/kmemleak/arch-support.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
| openrisc: | TODO |
| parisc: | TODO |
| powerpc: | ok |
- | riscv: | TODO |
+ | riscv: | ok |
| s390: | ok |
| sh: | ok |
| sparc: | ok |
diff --git a/Documentation/features/debug/stackprotector/arch-support.txt b/Documentation/features/debug/stackprotector/arch-support.txt
index 3db4763aa3f5..3329559c8207 100644
--- a/Documentation/features/debug/stackprotector/arch-support.txt
+++ b/Documentation/features/debug/stackprotector/arch-support.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
| openrisc: | TODO |
| parisc: | TODO |
| powerpc: | ok |
- | riscv: | TODO |
+ | riscv: | ok |
| s390: | TODO |
| sh: | ok |
| sparc: | TODO |
diff --git a/Documentation/features/locking/lockdep/arch-support.txt b/Documentation/features/locking/lockdep/arch-support.txt
index 4f844ecd0680..940b0bd02957 100644
--- a/Documentation/features/locking/lockdep/arch-support.txt
+++ b/Documentation/features/locking/lockdep/arch-support.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
| openrisc: | ok |
| parisc: | TODO |
| powerpc: | ok |
- | riscv: | TODO |
+ | riscv: | ok |
| s390: | ok |
| sh: | ok |
| sparc: | ok |
diff --git a/Documentation/features/time/context-tracking/arch-support.txt b/Documentation/features/time/context-tracking/arch-support.txt
index a71f3a945285..266c81e8a721 100644
--- a/Documentation/features/time/context-tracking/arch-support.txt
+++ b/Documentation/features/time/context-tracking/arch-support.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
| openrisc: | TODO |
| parisc: | TODO |
| powerpc: | ok |
- | riscv: | TODO |
+ | riscv: | ok |
| s390: | TODO |
| sh: | TODO |
| sparc: | ok |
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/journalling.rst b/Documentation/filesystems/journalling.rst
index 58ce6b395206..7e2be2faf653 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/journalling.rst
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/journalling.rst
@@ -10,27 +10,27 @@ Details
The journalling layer is easy to use. You need to first of all create a
journal_t data structure. There are two calls to do this dependent on
how you decide to allocate the physical media on which the journal
-resides. The :c:func:`jbd2_journal_init_inode` call is for journals stored in
-filesystem inodes, or the :c:func:`jbd2_journal_init_dev` call can be used
+resides. The jbd2_journal_init_inode() call is for journals stored in
+filesystem inodes, or the jbd2_journal_init_dev() call can be used
for journal stored on a raw device (in a continuous range of blocks). A
journal_t is a typedef for a struct pointer, so when you are finally
-finished make sure you call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_destroy` on it to free up
+finished make sure you call jbd2_journal_destroy() on it to free up
any used kernel memory.
Once you have got your journal_t object you need to 'mount' or load the
journal file. The journalling layer expects the space for the journal
was already allocated and initialized properly by the userspace tools.
-When loading the journal you must call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_load` to process
+When loading the journal you must call jbd2_journal_load() to process
journal contents. If the client file system detects the journal contents
does not need to be processed (or even need not have valid contents), it
-may call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_wipe` to clear the journal contents before
-calling :c:func:`jbd2_journal_load`.
+may call jbd2_journal_wipe() to clear the journal contents before
+calling jbd2_journal_load().
Note that jbd2_journal_wipe(..,0) calls
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_skip_recovery` for you if it detects any outstanding
-transactions in the journal and similarly :c:func:`jbd2_journal_load` will
-call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_recover` if necessary. I would advise reading
-:c:func:`ext4_load_journal` in fs/ext4/super.c for examples on this stage.
+jbd2_journal_skip_recovery() for you if it detects any outstanding
+transactions in the journal and similarly jbd2_journal_load() will
+call jbd2_journal_recover() if necessary. I would advise reading
+ext4_load_journal() in fs/ext4/super.c for examples on this stage.
Now you can go ahead and start modifying the underlying filesystem.
Almost.
@@ -39,57 +39,57 @@ You still need to actually journal your filesystem changes, this is done
by wrapping them into transactions. Additionally you also need to wrap
the modification of each of the buffers with calls to the journal layer,
so it knows what the modifications you are actually making are. To do
-this use :c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` which returns a transaction handle.
+this use jbd2_journal_start() which returns a transaction handle.
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` and its counterpart :c:func:`jbd2_journal_stop`,
+jbd2_journal_start() and its counterpart jbd2_journal_stop(),
which indicates the end of a transaction are nestable calls, so you can
reenter a transaction if necessary, but remember you must call
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_stop` the same number of times as
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` before the transaction is completed (or more
+jbd2_journal_stop() the same number of times as
+jbd2_journal_start() before the transaction is completed (or more
accurately leaves the update phase). Ext4/VFS makes use of this feature to
simplify handling of inode dirtying, quota support, etc.
Inside each transaction you need to wrap the modifications to the
individual buffers (blocks). Before you start to modify a buffer you
-need to call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_get_create_access()` /
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_get_write_access()` /
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_get_undo_access()` as appropriate, this allows the
+need to call jbd2_journal_get_create_access() /
+jbd2_journal_get_write_access() /
+jbd2_journal_get_undo_access() as appropriate, this allows the
journalling layer to copy the unmodified
data if it needs to. After all the buffer may be part of a previously
uncommitted transaction. At this point you are at last ready to modify a
buffer, and once you are have done so you need to call
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_dirty_metadata`. Or if you've asked for access to a
+jbd2_journal_dirty_metadata(). Or if you've asked for access to a
buffer you now know is now longer required to be pushed back on the
-device you can call :c:func:`jbd2_journal_forget` in much the same way as you
-might have used :c:func:`bforget` in the past.
+device you can call jbd2_journal_forget() in much the same way as you
+might have used bforget() in the past.
-A :c:func:`jbd2_journal_flush` may be called at any time to commit and
+A jbd2_journal_flush() may be called at any time to commit and
checkpoint all your transactions.
-Then at umount time , in your :c:func:`put_super` you can then call
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_destroy` to clean up your in-core journal object.
+Then at umount time , in your put_super() you can then call
+jbd2_journal_destroy() to clean up your in-core journal object.
Unfortunately there a couple of ways the journal layer can cause a
deadlock. The first thing to note is that each task can only have a
single outstanding transaction at any one time, remember nothing commits
-until the outermost :c:func:`jbd2_journal_stop`. This means you must complete
+until the outermost jbd2_journal_stop(). This means you must complete
the transaction at the end of each file/inode/address etc. operation you
perform, so that the journalling system isn't re-entered on another
journal. Since transactions can't be nested/batched across differing
journals, and another filesystem other than yours (say ext4) may be
modified in a later syscall.
-The second case to bear in mind is that :c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` can block
+The second case to bear in mind is that jbd2_journal_start() can block
if there isn't enough space in the journal for your transaction (based
on the passed nblocks param) - when it blocks it merely(!) needs to wait
for transactions to complete and be committed from other tasks, so
-essentially we are waiting for :c:func:`jbd2_journal_stop`. So to avoid
-deadlocks you must treat :c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` /
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_stop` as if they were semaphores and include them in
+essentially we are waiting for jbd2_journal_stop(). So to avoid
+deadlocks you must treat jbd2_journal_start() /
+jbd2_journal_stop() as if they were semaphores and include them in
your semaphore ordering rules to prevent
-deadlocks. Note that :c:func:`jbd2_journal_extend` has similar blocking
-behaviour to :c:func:`jbd2_journal_start` so you can deadlock here just as
-easily as on :c:func:`jbd2_journal_start`.
+deadlocks. Note that jbd2_journal_extend() has similar blocking
+behaviour to jbd2_journal_start() so you can deadlock here just as
+easily as on jbd2_journal_start().
Try to reserve the right number of blocks the first time. ;-). This will
be the maximum number of blocks you are going to touch in this
@@ -116,8 +116,8 @@ called after each transaction commit. You can also use
that need processing when the transaction commits.
JBD2 also provides a way to block all transaction updates via
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_lock_updates()` /
-:c:func:`jbd2_journal_unlock_updates()`. Ext4 uses this when it wants a
+jbd2_journal_lock_updates() /
+jbd2_journal_unlock_updates(). Ext4 uses this when it wants a
window with a clean and stable fs for a moment. E.g.
::
diff --git a/Documentation/i2c/index.rst b/Documentation/i2c/index.rst
index fee4744475df..8a2ad3845191 100644
--- a/Documentation/i2c/index.rst
+++ b/Documentation/i2c/index.rst
@@ -62,7 +62,6 @@ Legacy documentation
.. toctree::
:maxdepth: 1
- upgrading-clients
old-module-parameters
.. only:: subproject and html
diff --git a/Documentation/i2c/upgrading-clients.rst b/Documentation/i2c/upgrading-clients.rst
deleted file mode 100644
index 1708090d7b8f..000000000000
--- a/Documentation/i2c/upgrading-clients.rst
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,285 +0,0 @@
-=================================================
-Upgrading I2C Drivers to the new 2.6 Driver Model
-=================================================
-
-Ben Dooks <ben-linux@fluff.org>
-
-Introduction
-------------
-
-This guide outlines how to alter existing Linux 2.6 client drivers from
-the old to the new binding methods.
-
-
-Example old-style driver
-------------------------
-
-::
-
- struct example_state {
- struct i2c_client client;
- ....
- };
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver;
-
- static unsigned short ignore[] = { I2C_CLIENT_END };
- static unsigned short normal_addr[] = { OUR_ADDR, I2C_CLIENT_END };
-
- I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD;
-
- static int example_attach(struct i2c_adapter *adap, int addr, int kind)
- {
- struct example_state *state;
- struct device *dev = &adap->dev; /* to use for dev_ reports */
- int ret;
-
- state = kzalloc(sizeof(struct example_state), GFP_KERNEL);
- if (state == NULL) {
- dev_err(dev, "failed to create our state\n");
- return -ENOMEM;
- }
-
- example->client.addr = addr;
- example->client.flags = 0;
- example->client.adapter = adap;
-
- i2c_set_clientdata(&state->i2c_client, state);
- strscpy(client->i2c_client.name, "example", sizeof(client->i2c_client.name));
-
- ret = i2c_attach_client(&state->i2c_client);
- if (ret < 0) {
- dev_err(dev, "failed to attach client\n");
- kfree(state);
- return ret;
- }
-
- dev = &state->i2c_client.dev;
-
- /* rest of the initialisation goes here. */
-
- dev_info(dev, "example client created\n");
-
- return 0;
- }
-
- static int example_detach(struct i2c_client *client)
- {
- struct example_state *state = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
-
- i2c_detach_client(client);
- kfree(state);
- return 0;
- }
-
- static int example_attach_adapter(struct i2c_adapter *adap)
- {
- return i2c_probe(adap, &addr_data, example_attach);
- }
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver = {
- .driver = {
- .owner = THIS_MODULE,
- .name = "example",
- .pm = &example_pm_ops,
- },
- .attach_adapter = example_attach_adapter,
- .detach_client = example_detach,
- };
-
-
-Updating the client
--------------------
-
-The new style binding model will check against a list of supported
-devices and their associated address supplied by the code registering
-the busses. This means that the driver .attach_adapter and
-.detach_client methods can be removed, along with the addr_data,
-as follows::
-
- - static struct i2c_driver example_driver;
-
- - static unsigned short ignore[] = { I2C_CLIENT_END };
- - static unsigned short normal_addr[] = { OUR_ADDR, I2C_CLIENT_END };
-
- - I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD;
-
- - static int example_attach_adapter(struct i2c_adapter *adap)
- - {
- - return i2c_probe(adap, &addr_data, example_attach);
- - }
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver = {
- - .attach_adapter = example_attach_adapter,
- - .detach_client = example_detach,
- }
-
-Add the probe and remove methods to the i2c_driver, as so::
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver = {
- + .probe = example_probe,
- + .remove = example_remove,
- }
-
-Change the example_attach method to accept the new parameters
-which include the i2c_client that it will be working with::
-
- - static int example_attach(struct i2c_adapter *adap, int addr, int kind)
- + static int example_probe(struct i2c_client *client,
- + const struct i2c_device_id *id)
-
-Change the name of example_attach to example_probe to align it with the
-i2c_driver entry names. The rest of the probe routine will now need to be
-changed as the i2c_client has already been setup for use.
-
-The necessary client fields have already been setup before
-the probe function is called, so the following client setup
-can be removed::
-
- - example->client.addr = addr;
- - example->client.flags = 0;
- - example->client.adapter = adap;
- -
- - strscpy(client->i2c_client.name, "example", sizeof(client->i2c_client.name));
-
-The i2c_set_clientdata is now::
-
- - i2c_set_clientdata(&state->client, state);
- + i2c_set_clientdata(client, state);
-
-The call to i2c_attach_client is no longer needed, if the probe
-routine exits successfully, then the driver will be automatically
-attached by the core. Change the probe routine as so::
-
- - ret = i2c_attach_client(&state->i2c_client);
- - if (ret < 0) {
- - dev_err(dev, "failed to attach client\n");
- - kfree(state);
- - return ret;
- - }
-
-
-Remove the storage of 'struct i2c_client' from the 'struct example_state'
-as we are provided with the i2c_client in our example_probe. Instead we
-store a pointer to it for when it is needed.
-
-::
-
- struct example_state {
- - struct i2c_client client;
- + struct i2c_client *client;
-
-the new i2c client as so::
-
- - struct device *dev = &adap->dev; /* to use for dev_ reports */
- + struct device *dev = &i2c_client->dev; /* to use for dev_ reports */
-
-And remove the change after our client is attached, as the driver no
-longer needs to register a new client structure with the core::
-
- - dev = &state->i2c_client.dev;
-
-In the probe routine, ensure that the new state has the client stored
-in it::
-
- static int example_probe(struct i2c_client *i2c_client,
- const struct i2c_device_id *id)
- {
- struct example_state *state;
- struct device *dev = &i2c_client->dev;
- int ret;
-
- state = kzalloc(sizeof(struct example_state), GFP_KERNEL);
- if (state == NULL) {
- dev_err(dev, "failed to create our state\n");
- return -ENOMEM;
- }
-
- + state->client = i2c_client;
-
-Update the detach method, by changing the name to _remove and
-to delete the i2c_detach_client call. It is possible that you
-can also remove the ret variable as it is not needed for any
-of the core functions.
-
-::
-
- - static int example_detach(struct i2c_client *client)
- + static int example_remove(struct i2c_client *client)
- {
- struct example_state *state = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
-
- - i2c_detach_client(client);
-
-And finally ensure that we have the correct ID table for the i2c-core
-and other utilities::
-
- + struct i2c_device_id example_idtable[] = {
- + { "example", 0 },
- + { }
- +};
- +
- +MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE(i2c, example_idtable);
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver = {
- .driver = {
- .owner = THIS_MODULE,
- .name = "example",
- },
- + .id_table = example_ids,
-
-
-Our driver should now look like this::
-
- struct example_state {
- struct i2c_client *client;
- ....
- };
-
- static int example_probe(struct i2c_client *client,
- const struct i2c_device_id *id)
- {
- struct example_state *state;
- struct device *dev = &client->dev;
-
- state = kzalloc(sizeof(struct example_state), GFP_KERNEL);
- if (state == NULL) {
- dev_err(dev, "failed to create our state\n");
- return -ENOMEM;
- }
-
- state->client = client;
- i2c_set_clientdata(client, state);
-
- /* rest of the initialisation goes here. */
-
- dev_info(dev, "example client created\n");
-
- return 0;
- }
-
- static int example_remove(struct i2c_client *client)
- {
- struct example_state *state = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
-
- kfree(state);
- return 0;
- }
-
- static struct i2c_device_id example_idtable[] = {
- { "example", 0 },
- { }
- };
-
- MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE(i2c, example_idtable);
-
- static struct i2c_driver example_driver = {
- .driver = {
- .owner = THIS_MODULE,
- .name = "example",
- .pm = &example_pm_ops,
- },
- .id_table = example_idtable,
- .probe = example_probe,
- .remove = example_remove,
- };
diff --git a/Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst b/Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst
index 1b577a8bf982..4cefed8048ca 100644
--- a/Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst
+++ b/Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ Introduction
============
The kernel provides a variety of locking primitives which can be divided
-into two categories:
+into three categories:
- Sleeping locks
- CPU local locks
diff --git a/Documentation/process/2.Process.rst b/Documentation/process/2.Process.rst
index 3588f48841eb..4ae1e0f600c1 100644
--- a/Documentation/process/2.Process.rst
+++ b/Documentation/process/2.Process.rst
@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ than one development cycle past their initial release. So, for example, the
5.2 kernel's history looked like this (all dates in 2019):
============== ===============================
- September 15 5.2 stable release
+ July 7 5.2 stable release
July 14 5.2.1
July 21 5.2.2
July 26 5.2.3
diff --git a/Documentation/trace/intel_th.rst b/Documentation/trace/intel_th.rst
index 70b7126eaeeb..b31818d5f6c5 100644
--- a/Documentation/trace/intel_th.rst
+++ b/Documentation/trace/intel_th.rst
@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ Bus and Subdevices
For each Intel TH device in the system a bus of its own is
created and assigned an id number that reflects the order in which TH
-devices were emumerated. All TH subdevices (devices on intel_th bus)
+devices were enumerated. All TH subdevices (devices on intel_th bus)
begin with this id: 0-gth, 0-msc0, 0-msc1, 0-pti, 0-sth, which is
followed by device's name and an optional index.
diff --git a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/cpu-load.rst b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/cpu-load.rst
index 0116d0477799..c972731c0e57 100644
--- a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/cpu-load.rst
+++ b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/cpu-load.rst
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
-=======
+========
CPU 负载
-=======
+========
Linux通过``/proc/stat``和``/proc/uptime``导出各种信息,用户空间工具
如top(1)使用这些信息计算系统花费在某个特定状态的平均时间。
diff --git a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/index.rst b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/index.rst
index 7d502fa5da64..ed5ab7e37f38 100644
--- a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/index.rst
+++ b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/admin-guide/index.rst
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
.. include:: ../disclaimer-zh_CN.rst
-:Original: :ref:`Documentation/admin-guide/index.rst`
+:Original: :doc:`../../../admin-guide/index`
:Translator: Alex Shi <alex.shi@linux.alibaba.com>

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