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-rw-r--r--Documentation/core-api/idr.rst32
1 files changed, 16 insertions, 16 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst b/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
index a2738050c4f0..2eb5afdb9931 100644
--- a/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
+++ b/Documentation/core-api/idr.rst
@@ -20,48 +20,48 @@ only ID allocation, and as a result is much more memory-efficient.
IDR usage
=========
-Start by initialising an IDR, either with :c:func:`DEFINE_IDR`
-for statically allocated IDRs or :c:func:`idr_init` for dynamically
+Start by initialising an IDR, either with DEFINE_IDR()
+for statically allocated IDRs or idr_init() for dynamically
allocated IDRs.
-You can call :c:func:`idr_alloc` to allocate an unused ID. Look up
-the pointer you associated with the ID by calling :c:func:`idr_find`
-and free the ID by calling :c:func:`idr_remove`.
+You can call idr_alloc() to allocate an unused ID. Look up
+the pointer you associated with the ID by calling idr_find()
+and free the ID by calling idr_remove().
If you need to change the pointer associated with an ID, you can call
-:c:func:`idr_replace`. One common reason to do this is to reserve an
+idr_replace(). One common reason to do this is to reserve an
ID by passing a ``NULL`` pointer to the allocation function; initialise the
object with the reserved ID and finally insert the initialised object
into the IDR.
Some users need to allocate IDs larger than ``INT_MAX``. So far all of
these users have been content with a ``UINT_MAX`` limit, and they use
-:c:func:`idr_alloc_u32`. If you need IDs that will not fit in a u32,
+idr_alloc_u32(). If you need IDs that will not fit in a u32,
we will work with you to address your needs.
If you need to allocate IDs sequentially, you can use
-:c:func:`idr_alloc_cyclic`. The IDR becomes less efficient when dealing
+idr_alloc_cyclic(). The IDR becomes less efficient when dealing
with larger IDs, so using this function comes at a slight cost.
To perform an action on all pointers used by the IDR, you can
-either use the callback-based :c:func:`idr_for_each` or the
-iterator-style :c:func:`idr_for_each_entry`. You may need to use
-:c:func:`idr_for_each_entry_continue` to continue an iteration. You can
-also use :c:func:`idr_get_next` if the iterator doesn't fit your needs.
+either use the callback-based idr_for_each() or the
+iterator-style idr_for_each_entry(). You may need to use
+idr_for_each_entry_continue() to continue an iteration. You can
+also use idr_get_next() if the iterator doesn't fit your needs.
-When you have finished using an IDR, you can call :c:func:`idr_destroy`
+When you have finished using an IDR, you can call idr_destroy()
to release the memory used by the IDR. This will not free the objects
pointed to from the IDR; if you want to do that, use one of the iterators
to do it.
-You can use :c:func:`idr_is_empty` to find out whether there are any
+You can use idr_is_empty() to find out whether there are any
IDs currently allocated.
If you need to take a lock while allocating a new ID from the IDR,
you may need to pass a restrictive set of GFP flags, which can lead
to the IDR being unable to allocate memory. To work around this,
-you can call :c:func:`idr_preload` before taking the lock, and then
-:c:func:`idr_preload_end` after the allocation.
+you can call idr_preload() before taking the lock, and then
+idr_preload_end() after the allocation.
.. kernel-doc:: include/linux/idr.h
:doc: idr sync

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